Twitter Friday: How to Measure Twitter Authority? | White.net

Twitter Friday: How to Measure Twitter Authority?

By Tad Chef / March 6, 2009

This week the focus of much Twitter buzz was the question how to measure Twitter authority. There is a growing sentiment and consensus that it can’t be the sheer number of followers as it’s easily manipulated and even if the followers are real you can’t effectively follow them back without drowning in information overflow.

So a huge following on Twitter makes it a one way broadcasting channel similar to old media a instead of the much touted one to one social networking conversation.

Numerous experiments are on the way to measure Twitter authority. Some are quite simple while others are already scientific. They analyze, organize and categorize quite impressive amounts of raw data.

Two simple attempts at measuring Twitter authority are by “#followfridayendorsements and by retweets or retweetability. Both attempts are not wrong but like the sheer number of followers quite limited to one metric. Some people might not get retweeted much but still be Twitter giants.
Two very complex and advanced attempts at finding out who really matters on Twitter are those by Twitalyzer and TwitterFriends.

Twitalyzer introduces a whole set of Twitter activity metrics. They get measured and also evaluated. The metrics are:

  • Influence
  • Signal
  • Generosity
  • Velocity
  • Clout

I especially like the signal to noise ratio as it shows who’s just chatting and who offers real value on Twitter by links, retweets, hashtags, mentions of other people. My ratio is above 80%. My other metrics are mostly bad though.

TwitterFriends is really a whole suite of different tools to analyze, organize and visualize your Twitter network and actvity. I’ve seen quite a lot Twitter analytics and stats tools but this one seems the by far the most advanced to me as of now. For instance my link quotient is at 31.6% while the Twitter average is just 20%. So I guess that almost one third of my tweets contain a link while the average Twitter user adds a link to every fifth tweet.

How good/bad are your stats? Add them in the comment section! I might start following you if they’re good enough 😉

Did you like this post? It’s part of a weekly column called Twitter Friday. Make sure to come back in a week and check out the last one.

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